Win tickets to the 2010 FIFA World Cup with your best football image

Soccerlens Special: Win a Sony Cybershot W210 by submitting your images to the Sony Campaign Award.

Do you love sport? Are you passionate about photography? Would you like to go to the 2010 FIFA World Cup, sponsored by Sony?

As sports fans get ready for the biggest football event of next year, the Sony World Photography Awards – one of the largest global photographic competitions – is looking to uncover the best amateur football photographs in the world for the 2010 Campaign Award. The winning photographer will win tickets, travel and accommodation to a FIFA World Cup game in South Africa.

Combining the global love for football and sports photography, the Campaign Award seeks to find an image that captures the emotion and the passion of football from the fan’s point of view – the highs, the lows, and the incredible lengths supporters will go to support their teams. The award is now in its second year and was won in 2009 by Pakistani photographer Sarah Ahmad for her photograph titled “The Love of the Game: a cook, a cleaner, a mother… and an attacking midfielder”.

All submitted images will be shown in a gallery the Sony World Photography Awards website and rated by the public. The top 100 images will then be presented to a judging panel chaired by Delly Carr, one of the world’s leading and multi award winning sports photographers.

W210_Black_LeftSoccerlens Special: Win a Sony Cybershot W210 by submitting your images to the Sony Campaign Award

Sony have offered all Soccerlens readers a chance to win their new 12.1 MP Sony Cybershot W210 camera – all entries from Soccerlens.com will go into a side draw and a lucky winner will be picked at random after the contest entries are closed.

You can read more about the Sony Cybershot W210 here.

After you make your submission to the Sony Campaign Award, make sure you send in your submissions to contests@footballmedia.com as well.

The overall winner of the Campaign Award will receive:

· Two tickets to the 2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa, sponsored by Sony (travel and accommodation included)

· Two VIP tickets to attend the Sony World Photography Awards gala ceremony in April 2010 in Cannes, France (including flights and two nights’ accommodation in a luxury hotel on the famous Croisette)

· A DLSR camera and lens

· The opportunity to be one of the photographers used in the forthcoming digital imaging FY10 campaign work from Sony

sony-photography-awards A selection of shortlisted images entered to the competition, including the winner, will be exhibited in Cannes, April 2010.

The competition is free to enter and open to amateur photographers from across the globe. The closing date is Friday 4 January 2010.

Submission Rules:

  • Submissions to the Campaign Award opened on Monday 1 June and will close on Friday 4th January 2010 at 23.59hrs GMT
  • The competition is free to enter and all images submitted must have been shot in 2009
  • Amateur photographers can also enter the Sports category, part of the main Sony World Photography Awards competition. Up to three images taken in 2009 can be entered to the competition for the chance to win the converted Sony World Photography Awards Amateur Photographer of the Year title and a grand prize of $5,000 (USD) and Sony camera equipment.

For further information about the awards and to enter the competition please visit www.worldphotographyawards.org.

Soccerlens Special: Win a Sony Cybershot W210 by submitting your images to the Sony Campaign Award

Sony have offered all Soccerlens readers a chance to win their new 12.1 MP Sony Cybershot W210 camera – all entries from Soccerlens.com will go into a side draw and a lucky winner will be picked at random after the contest entries are closed.

You can read more about the Sony Cybershot W210 here.

After you make your submission to the Sony Campaign Award, make sure you send in your submissions to contests@footballmedia.com as well.

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